Site Announcements

A note from the NYFalls.com founder:
Due to a company restructuring, I will be losing my full time job soon. Although it saddens me to leave the company that I have helped build up for the last 14 years to the success it is today, I am looking forward to new opportunities. I am known for my technical, managerial, and creative abilities, and I hope to utilize all of those talents in my next career. I put together a résumé outlining my skills and projects. Please have a look. Although I am open to any management position, I would like to leverage my experience and success with NYFalls.com and NYHistoric.com into a career in the WNY travel/tourism industry. If you know of a company that would benefit from someone with talents and experience, please spread the word. Thank you for your help and support.
Here is my Resume | Discussion topic

Deer

Talk about sightings and get help identifying Plants, Animals, Fish, and Fungi. Share pictures and video.

Moderators: Brenda, Kelly

Deer

Postby Brenda » Mon Sep 10, 2007 4:27 pm

While this video is wrong on so many levels, I can't help but have that "Awww" response. Also, with the season approaching I thought that it would be a good time to start this thread because, while I don't hunt, I am the "camp cook." It's not that I'm squeamish--I've aged hundreds of dead deer and helped field dress many, but I can't kill them myself. Anti-hunters, feel free to comment. Recipes are also available. :)

http://video.yahoo.com:80/video/play?vid=67160&fr=yvmtf
Finger Lakes Mill Creek Cabins
http://www.fingerlakescabins.com
User avatar
Brenda
VIP II
VIP II
 
Posts: 2835
Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2007 3:01 pm
Location: Lodi
Camera Model: Canon PowerShot SX20 IS
Challenge wins: :star1:

Advertisement

Thanks for supporting our site by using our advertisers!

Postby Matt » Mon Sep 10, 2007 6:18 pm

aged? Field dress? huh?
User avatar
Matt
President
President
 
Posts: 13956
Joined: Sun Apr 23, 2006 6:01 pm
Location: Chili, NY
Camera Model: Olympus OMD Em-1; E-5
Challenge wins: :star:

Postby cbobcat49 » Mon Sep 10, 2007 11:02 pm

Are we to assume that these deer are these people's pets or are they wild and have gotten used to humans? It seems like they're pets. If so, that video isn't any different than filling up my dog bowl and then watch him walk up and start eating.

If we're going to start a hunting/anti-hunting thread... I don't have any problem with hunting or hunters. They do help control the population. Better to be shot than roadkill or starvation.

I could never bring myself to kill another mammal though. It's just not in me.


Chris
User avatar
cbobcat49
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 1876
Joined: Wed May 24, 2006 8:19 pm
Location: Tonawanda, NY
Camera Model: Olympus Stylus 400
Challenge wins: :star1:

Postby Brenda » Tue Sep 11, 2007 11:28 am

mconheady wrote:aged? Field dress? huh?


When I was a seasonal with the DEC (in wildlife) I worked at a cooperative hunting area which also operated as a deer check station during gun season. Hunters could bring their deer there to be aged and weighed. I had to be recertified to age deer every year, using the wear and replacement method (lower teeth). I also had to travel around to area deer processors throughout the season to collect data on the deer they had in their walk-in coolers.

Field dressing involves preparing the deer to be taken to the processor, unless you cut up your own deer, which we don't. It's a messy, unpleasant task, but I've helped my husband on numerous occasions.

I really didn't think that there would be many people here who would disagree that populations need to be controlled. However, living in the heart of wine country, I do struggle with the number of nuisance permits that are issued to protect the vineyards.

As far as the video goes, I have a huge problem with people keeping wild animals as pets or doing anything to reduce their natural fear of humans. Feeding deer encourages them to gather in larger numbers than they normally would, thus increasing the potential for the spread of disease. (I'll talk more about Chronic Wasting Disease later.) While it might be cute to have a deer eat from your hand, or at your table, the next person that deer trustingly approaches may be carrying a gun.
Finger Lakes Mill Creek Cabins
http://www.fingerlakescabins.com
User avatar
Brenda
VIP II
VIP II
 
Posts: 2835
Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2007 3:01 pm
Location: Lodi
Camera Model: Canon PowerShot SX20 IS
Challenge wins: :star1:

Postby Brenda » Tue Sep 11, 2007 11:41 am

http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/7191.html

Chronic Wasting Disease

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) is a rare, fatal, neurological disease found in cervids, members of the deer family. It is a transmissible disease that slowly attacks the brain of infected deer and elk, causing the animals to progressively become emaciated, display abnormal behavior and invariably results in the death of the infected animal. It has been known to occur in wild elk and deer populations in parts of some western states for decades. The disease has also been confirmed in captive deer and elk herds in several western states and Canadian Provinces. Its discovery in wild deer in south-central Wisconsin in 2002 has generated unprecedented attention from wildlife managers, hunters, and others interested in deer. CWD poses a significant threat to the deer and elk of North America and, if unchecked, could dramatically alter the future management of wild deer and elk.

CWD is one of a group of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) that include scrapie in sheep and goats, transmissible mink encephalopathy of ranched mink, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), known as "mad cow disease", in cattle. TSE's are thought to be caused by abnormal, proteinaceous, infectious particles called prions (pree-ons). CWD occurs naturally only in mule deer, white-tailed deer and Rocky Mountain Elk and very likely other subspecies of elk. The mode of transmission of CWD has not yet been fully identified and research is ongoing to explore possibilities of transmission of CWD to other species. However, evidence has shown that the disease can pass from cervid to cervid by direct contact through saliva, urine, and feces, and by indirect contact through environmental contamination with infective substances. There is no known treatment for CWD and it is always fatal. Currently there is no evidence that CWD poses a risk for humans or domestic animals.

The state Departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC), Agriculture and Markets (DAM), and Health (DOH), together with the United States Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS) are cooperating to develop a comprehensive statewide response to the threat of CWD. Together we are actively participating with other agencies and organizations in nationwide efforts to learn more about this disease and to prevent its spread. New York has a vigilant wildlife disease monitoring program in place, comprised of three main components. The first is a regulatory component designed to reduce the risk of bringing the disease into NY from other parts of the country and minimizing its spread if it is brought here. The second part is an ongoing field surveillance program to ensure the early detection of CWD and the third part is an agency response plan in the event that CWD is found. Through these active surveillance programs the cooperating state agencies first detected and verified positive cases of CWD in two captive deer herds in March 2005. A response plan was then initiated to remove future threats for these captive herds and implement a sampling strategy to determine if CWD had spread into wild New York deer herds.
Finger Lakes Mill Creek Cabins
http://www.fingerlakescabins.com
User avatar
Brenda
VIP II
VIP II
 
Posts: 2835
Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2007 3:01 pm
Location: Lodi
Camera Model: Canon PowerShot SX20 IS
Challenge wins: :star1:

Postby cbobcat49 » Tue Sep 11, 2007 11:45 am

> While it might be cute to have a deer eat from your hand, or at your table, the
> next person that deer trustingly approaches may be carrying a gun.

I agree completely. Driving along the roads of Allegany S.P. you can see whole families of raccoons along the side of the road waiting for handouts... because they're used to it. This then increases danger to the animals themselves (potential roadkill) and to humans (car damage and maybe rabies from bites).

They have a lot of trouble with this in the national parks out west. When we were in Yosemite we heard about a mule deer running over and seriously injuring a young boy... because the animal was conditioned to humans. We also saw a video of a grizzly bear ripping off the door to a car like its claws were a can opener. That was pretty impressive.

Chris
User avatar
cbobcat49
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 1876
Joined: Wed May 24, 2006 8:19 pm
Location: Tonawanda, NY
Camera Model: Olympus Stylus 400
Challenge wins: :star1:

Postby backpacker » Mon Oct 01, 2007 8:14 pm

I've watched this doe raise her fawns all summer I finely got a good picture of them tonight,

Image


Here are the two fawns

Image


I also have another doe that has one fawn most of the time the five are togather but not today :(
The Mountains are Calling and I must Go John Muir
my flickr gallery
46er interview
User avatar
backpacker
Board Expert
Board Expert
 
Posts: 911
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 10:16 am
Location: Oriskany Falls
Camera Model: Nikon D90, D40x, Lenses Nikor 12-24, 18-105 vr, 18-135, 70-300 vr, sigma 150-5oo os
Challenge wins: :star1:

Postby Brenda » Tue Oct 02, 2007 10:15 am

Awww, so pretty. I had a fawn out by the gazebo last week, but the dogs spotted it through the window and scared it off before I could grab the camera.
Finger Lakes Mill Creek Cabins
http://www.fingerlakescabins.com
User avatar
Brenda
VIP II
VIP II
 
Posts: 2835
Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2007 3:01 pm
Location: Lodi
Camera Model: Canon PowerShot SX20 IS
Challenge wins: :star1:

EHD found in deer

Postby backpacker » Wed Oct 17, 2007 3:12 pm

For Release: IMMEDIATE Contact: Maureen Wren
Tuesday, October 16, 2007 (518) 402-8000

DEC CONFIRMS FIRST CASE OF DEER DISEASE IN NEW YORK
Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease is Detected in Deer Samples From Albany
County

Recent tests for Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD) in several
Albany County deer have come back positive, the New York State
Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced today. This is
the first confirmed detection of EHD in New York State. EHD does not
present a threat to human health.

“DEC’s wildlife managers have been monitoring EHD as it has
worked its way north through neighboring states,” DEC Commissioner
Pete Grannis said. “While other states’ experiences indicate that it
is not anticipated to have a long-term effect on the health of our deer
herd, we will continue to monitor the spread of this disease and its
potential impact.”

EHD is predominantly a disease affecting deer and is transmitted by
certain types of biting flies called midges. It mainly affects deer in
late summer and fall, but the flies die and the disease subsides when
frosts and colder temperatures occur. EHD is common in many southeastern
states and has been reported throughout the mid-Atlantic this summer. In
states where the disease has been detected, it has not had a significant
negative impact on long-term health of the deer herd, and infecting
instead only localized pockets of animals within a geographic area.

The remains of more than twenty deer were found in the greater
Voorheesville area of Albany County in recent days. Several deer
carcasses were delivered to DEC’s Wildlife Pathology Laboratory in
Delmar, Albany County, to undergo a necropsy and microscopic examination
to determine possible cause of death. In addition to EHD, deer were
sampled for Chronic Wasting Disease, rabies, poisoning, and other
potential mortality causes. Samples were sent to the National Veterinary
Services Laboratory and the Southeast Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study
laboratory. Those tests confirmed the presence of EHD in the deer
tissue.

There are several symptoms of EHD, all of which are not
necessarily present in an infected deer. They include: swollen head,
neck, tongue or eyelids; erosion of the dental pad or ulcers on the
tongue; hemorrhaging of the heart, lungs, rumen and intestines; peeling
of hooves; and high fever, leading infected deer to sometimes be found
near water sources. For more information about EHD, go to
http://www.uga.edu/scwds/index.htm .

DEC continues to request the assistance of hunters and other outdoor
enthusiasts in providing information to the Department about any sick,
dying or dead animals encountered in the field. Sick or dead deer should
be promptly reported to the nearest regional DEC office or to
1-800-TIPP-DEC.

Hunters are reminded that they should always take simple
precautions to protect themselves from exposure to disease. Hunters that
harvest a deer that is found to be diseased may be issued a replacement
tag by DEC. To minimize the risk of transmission of any infectious
diseases when handling or processing deer, the following precautions are
recommended:

- Do not handle or eat any deer that appear sick, act strangely,
or are found dead and contact DEC immediately.
- Wear rubber gloves when field dressing game.
- Wash instruments and any parts of the body exposed to animal
tissues, blood, urine, etc. thoroughly with soap and water.
- Have your game processed promptly.
- Request that animals are processed individually, without mixing
or coming into contact with meat from other animals.
- Consumption of organ meat (including brain, spinal cord, and
other nervous tissue, spleen, pancreas, eyes, tonsils and lymph nodes)
may pose a greater risk of infection with a number of diseases. Hunters
should have deer boned out and have as much fat, connective tissue and
lymph nodes removed as possible.
- In general, people should not consume an animal known or
suspected to be ill.
The Mountains are Calling and I must Go John Muir
my flickr gallery
46er interview
User avatar
backpacker
Board Expert
Board Expert
 
Posts: 911
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 10:16 am
Location: Oriskany Falls
Camera Model: Nikon D90, D40x, Lenses Nikor 12-24, 18-105 vr, 18-135, 70-300 vr, sigma 150-5oo os
Challenge wins: :star1:

Postby Brenda » Wed Oct 17, 2007 4:09 pm

There was a time when I was more comfortable eating venison than beef from a grocery store. This makes me glad that we've agreed to share the costs of raising several beef cattle with a friend this winter.
Finger Lakes Mill Creek Cabins
http://www.fingerlakescabins.com
User avatar
Brenda
VIP II
VIP II
 
Posts: 2835
Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2007 3:01 pm
Location: Lodi
Camera Model: Canon PowerShot SX20 IS
Challenge wins: :star1:

Next

Return to Wildlife Identification and Discussion

Thanks for supporting our sponsors

Click for Finger Lakes pics
Adorama Pix

Thanks for supporting our sponsors

Finger Lakes pics
Adorama Pix